Announcements

Important Update from Dr. Paul Genecin about Measles Vaccination (April 30, 2019)

April 30, 2019

A message from Dr. Paul Genecin
To:  All Students, faculty and staff

Community concerns about the worsening measles outbreak prompt me to write to you with updated measles vaccine recommendations for those who are uncertain of their vaccine status. In alignment with current guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Yale Health recommends the following:

  • Adults born after 1957 should receive at least one dose of MMR vaccine (against mumps, measles and rubella) unless they have evidence of immunity.
    • Evidence of immunity requires:
      • Written proof of adequate immunization OR
      • A blood test to prove immunity OR
      • Laboratory evidence of active measles infection OR
      •  Birth before or during 1957 also counts as evidence of measles immunity.
    • A single dose of MMR is safe and effective for adults born after 1957 who lack evidence of immunity; this is our recommended approach because it obviates the need for blood testing.
      • A second option is a 2-step approach starting with a measles blood test. Adults without measles antibodies then receive at least one MMR dose.
  • Healthcare workers born after 1957 and lacking evidence of immunity are required to have two MMR doses, separated by at least 28 days.
  • College and graduate students, and international traveler need two MMR doses, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Early vaccination of infants < 12 months is recommended for international travel. Call your pediatric clinician if you have questions related to childhood immunization.
  • Persons exposed to measles who lack evidence of immunity should contact their clinician to obtain the measles blood test or vaccine.

To facilitate implementation of the above guidelines, Yale Health is hosting a Measles Vaccination Clinic at 55 Lock Street on Friday, May 10 from 1 to 4 PM. Adults can also obtain MMR vaccine at the Immunization Department weekdays 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.
 
You can find out more about measles on our home page where we provide relevant public health messages for the Yale community. The CDC publishes measles recommendations. All members of the Yale University community can reach Yale Health about vaccine-related questions at 203-432-0312.
 
IMPORTANT:
If you or a family member develops a fever with a rash and respiratory symptoms, it is crucial that you first call your medical provider for advice BEFORE coming into a health care facility and exposing others.

 

Important public health message about measles from Dr. Paul Genecin (April 15, 2019)

April 15, 2019

A message from Dr. Paul Genecin
To:  All Students, faculty and staff

Recent news reports show a large outbreak of measles cases in New York City and in Rockland county, New York. Most of these cases have involved people who were unvaccinated against measles. As of this Thursday, there has also been a report of a measles case in New Haven County linked to the ongoing outbreak in New York.

Measles can be a serious disease, but fortunately, we have a safe and effective vaccine. We ask that you get the measles vaccine if you are not immune. The measles vaccine takes effect quickly and will help protect you, your family and the community against the potentially serious complications of the illness. The disease is highly contagious among susceptible people.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people who received two doses of the measles vaccine or who have evidence of immunity on a blood test are considered immune. Other than in outbreak situations, members of the general population who were born before 1957 are also considered immune to measles. Contact Yale Health or your health care provider if you would like the vaccine, or if you are not sure whether you are immune to measles.

Although measles has been rare in the United States due to the widespread childhood immunization, the incidence has been rising in the past several years, driven in part by unvaccinated members of the community. Please note that measles is still common in parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa, and unvaccinated travelers with measles can bring the disease the United States.  International communities including universities are therefore at risk.

The majority of the people who have not been vaccinated, as well as a very small percentage of vaccinated individuals, will develop measles if exposed to someone with an active infection.  The virus is spread by personal contact or by exposure to droplets of respiratory fluid from people with measles.

When a susceptible person is infected with the measles virus, they usually become ill within 6 to 21 days (two weeks on average).  The symptoms include fever, rash, conjunctivitis (red, irritated eyes) and cough. People spread the virus to others for up to 4 days before they develop symptoms. Infants, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems who become ill with measles are at high risk for serious complications.
 
If you or a family member develop a fever with a rash and respiratory symptoms, it is crucial that you first call your medical provider for advice before coming into a health care facility and exposing others.  
 
All members of the Yale University community can reach Yale Health about vaccine-related questions at 203-432-0312.

 

Now You Can See More

In MyChart you can see the notes your provider writes in your medical record. It includes information you shared and your provider’s thoughts about your diagnosis and treatment. Visit Shared Notes to learn more.

box of shingrix vaccine and needle

National Shortage of Shingrix (Shingles Vaccine)

December 2018 Update

The Shingrix (shingles vaccine) shortage continues and is expected to last through 2019.

Yale Health will reach out to individual members to start the vaccine series as our supply allows. In this process we will prioritize those at highest risk of developing shingles.

Join Yale Health's Patient & Family Council

Yale Health’s Patient & Family Council is part of an effort to further advance the principles of patient-centered care.

  • Council members work together with Yale Health leadership to promote, review, and advise on operational processes and programs that address the needs of patients and families.  

  • Patients and family members will play a role as ‘patient partners’, acting as a resource to the organization.

Visit the Patient Partner Opportunities page for more information or to apply to the council.

Yale Health Offering Tours and Orientation

Are you a new Yale employee who recently joined Yale Health?

Maybe you’re a member who would like more information about your Yale Health coverage.

Join us for a tour of the Yale Health Center followed by an orientation session to learn about Yale Health. 

There will be time to ask questions in a group setting or on an individual basis.

There are multiple dates and times to choose from.

Register for your tour.

Thinking about quitting smoking? There's help available

Yale faculty and staff members and their dependents can learn about the Telephonic Tobacco Cessation Program, as well as additional means of support.

Learn about resources offered by Yale Health to help students quit.

Free resources available to help visitors to campus quit.

Read the Yale News article, “Thinking about quitting smoking? There’s help available”.

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