Announcements

Limiting Visitors to the Yale Health Center

We are restricting visitors, following these guidelines:
  • At this time, no guests or visitors are permitted to accompany adult patients, unless special assistance is required.
  • No guests or visitors are permitted to visit a patient in Inpatient Care or Acute Care.
  • Pediatric patients, elderly patients and those with special needs are permitted to bring no more than 1 guest.
  • Visitors who are sick, have a fever, or a confirmed case of COVID-19 (or a known exposure) should not visit or accompany a patient.
  • Visitors must wash their hands (or use sanitizer) before and after entering clinical areas and waiting rooms.

These restrictions are being put in place for the safety of our patients, caregivers and community. Thank you for your understanding.

COVID-19 update – Self-monitoring and limiting size of events (March 17, 2020)

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

I write with updated guidance on COVID-19 self-monitoring and limiting the size of Yale-hosted gatherings.

Updated recommendations for self-monitoring

Published reports about the range of symptoms in early COVID-19 infection allow us to update our recommendations about self-monitoring for symptoms of the disease.

Take these steps to monitor your health:

  • Take your temperature with a thermometer twice a day—once in the morning and once in the evening—to monitor for low-grade temperature elevation (>99.9°F, >37.7°C).
    • Note that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to list a temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) as a criterion for suspected COVID-19 infection, but low-grade fevers are frequent in the early stages of illness.  
  • Watch for the following symptoms to increase detection of possible COVID-19 infection:
    • Cough OR
    • Trouble breathing OR
    • Fatigue or malaise OR
    • Muscle aches (myalgia)

If you have any of these symptoms, you should stay home and avoid interactions with others. Consult Yale Health’s website for recommendations about managing your symptoms and deciding whether to contact your healthcare provider.

The following symptoms DECREASE the likelihood you have a COVID-19 infection and are therefore reassuring:

  • Ear pain
  • Sinus pain
  • Nasal congestion

If you have questions or concerns about any symptoms, you should contact your healthcare provider.  

Limiting the size of Yale-hosted meetings and events

To further reduce opportunities for people to be in close proximity with one another and in accordance with the latest CDC recommendations, the university is asking faculty, staff, and students to cancel, postpone, or adjust any Yale-hosted meeting or gathering that will have 10 participants or more. This new guidance replaces the information the university sent on March 7. Adjustments to events should include technology to allow remote participation. Zoom technology is available to all Yale community members and can be used to move an event, or portions of it, online.

Unless the benefits clearly outweigh the rising risk of disease transmission, we recommend adjusting all meetings, even if it will involve less than 10 people. If a meeting is essential, we recommend the smallest possible group. The CDC reports that the virus can spread between people who are within six feet of one another. Consider if the venue allows people adequate space to spread out. Adjust meeting rooms and formats as needed. Please remind meeting participants to take personal precautions and practice good hygiene, and clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces in all frequently used public areas.

As you postpone, cancel, or adjust an event, please communicate quickly and clearly with participants.
 
Visit Yale’s COVID-19 website for more information about the university’s response and links to important campus resources.

Please continue to take care of yourself and one another. Your actions directly have an impact on our ability to end this pandemic.

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Yale Health Center changes during COVID-19 outbreak

We are implementing measures to control the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus) infection in the Yale Health Center. These measures will protect our members for whom a visit is essential – and it will protect our staff to ensure that we are here to serve the Yale community. 

Please note the following changes.

Prescriptions

Infection Control and Social Distancing

  • We will ask everyone entering the Yale Health Center (including our staff) if they have any symptoms including cough, fever, difficulty breathing, and malaise and we will take their temperature. 
  • We will see any severely ill patient with suitable infection control measures including face mask.
  • For those with mild respiratory symptoms and an oral temperature of 100° or more, we will provide a face mask and ask them to call their primary care provider for clinical guidance rather than entering the facility. 
  • Our Immunizations Department will not be providing routine immunizations. We will let you know when we can resume this service. If you have a special vaccination need, your primary care provider can refer you.

Health Care for Yale Students Away From Campus, March 15, 2020

Yale University has asked students to remain away from the Yale campus for the remainder of the spring semester. We hope that you and your families remain safe and healthy during this time.

We are writing now to let all students know that Yale Health remains open for patient visits at our 55 Lock Street facility and to assist students by telephone weekdays through Student Health at 203-432-0312 and after hours at 203-432-0123. MyChart is always available and another good way for students to communicate with their Yale Health providers.  Students can get more information about MyChart and enroll in MyChart at https://yalehealth.yale.edu/appointments/using-mychart.

Students who have waived Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage should seek care in accordance with their health insurance plans. These students, of course, may use the services at the 55 Lock Street facility and may consult with Student Health at 203-432-0312 or with their clinicians at Yale Health’s Mental Health and Counseling Service at 203-432-0290 to develop plans for care while away from campus. 

The remainder of this message provides information for students who are enrolled in Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage for the spring semester. Spring semester Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage is effective through July 31, 2020.

Hospitalization and Specialty Care Coverage for Students in Connecticut

If you have Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage and are in Connecticut during this period, you should obtain care, as usual, through Yale Health providers at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street in New Haven. If you have questions about your care, please contact Student Health at 203-432-0312.

As always, urgent and emergency care is covered at 100% worldwide for students enrolled in Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage.

If you have questions regarding Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage during this period, please contact Member Services at 203-432-0246 or member.services@yale.edu.

Hospitalization and Specialty Care Coverage for Students Outside of Connecticut

As always, urgent and emergency care is covered at 100% worldwide for students enrolled in Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage.

If you are away from Connecticut and require non-emergent medical care, contact Student Health at 203-432-0312 and our staff will help you determine next steps. As of today and effective through July 31, 2020, unless students are invited to return to campus, Yale Health will expand its network of providers to allow for coverage outside of Connecticut for medically necessary treatment for chronic conditions and for prenatal and labor and delivery care. Please note that, with the exception of urgent and emergency services, you will need prior authorization from Student Health for coverage of these out-of-area services. 

Except for prenatal care, this extension of Yale Health’s provider network does not apply to preventive care and elective procedures or treatments. These services will be available as always through Yale Health providers at our 55 Lock Street facility. If you have questions regarding preventive care or elective procedures or treatments, you may contact Student Health to discuss options.

Out-of-area providers frequently request evidence of coverage. If you need a Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage member ID card, please complete this form: https://yalehealth.yale.edu/request-yale-health-member-id-card.

If you have questions regarding Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage during this period, please contact Member Services at 203-432-0246 or member.services@yale.edu.

Mental Health and Counseling Services

If you are currently receiving care from Yale Health’s Mental Health and Counseling Department, please contact your clinician at 203-432-0290 to develop a plan for care while you are away from campus. If you are in need of mental health services and are not receiving care from a clinician at Yale Health’s Mental Health and Counseling Department, please contact Mental Health and Counseling at 203-432-0290 for advice and options.

Pharmacy Services (all students with Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Care Coverage)

  • To ensure an adequate supply of medication, the Yale Health Pharmacy will authorize early medication refills for most maintenance medications (excluding controlled substances). If you have less than 50 days of your medication on hand, call the Pharmacy at 203-432-0033.
  • We recommend using Magellan Rx Home for mail delivery of your maintenance medications. Magellan will apply your benefit automatically so there will be no need for a claim form. You will pay only your copayment for your prescription.
  • To avoid unnecessary trips to the Yale Health facility, we will temporarily modify our reimbursement practices for use of non-Yale Health pharmacies. From now through July 31, 2020, you can fill your prescriptions at any pharmacy, pay for them at the time of service, and then complete a claim form to receive reimbursement for the cost of the medication less your regular copayment.

We will update you if the University’s plans change.  If you have questions or concerns that we have not covered in this message, please contact Member Services at 203-432-0246 or member.services@yale.edu.

Sincerely yours, 

Paul Genecin, M.D.
Director, Yale Health

COVID-19 Update from Yale Health - March 12, 2020

The outbreak of COVID-19 is creating uncertainty and concern for many. Yale Health has been working around the clock to prepare for the possibility of local cases and to ensure that we can provide the services you need to stay safe and healthy.

In all of our preparations, our primary focus is on reducing risk to our patients and to our staff. If you have questions or concerns, you can also call our COVID-19 hotline at 203-432-6604.

This is a rapidly evolving situation. Please continue to check email and our website frequently for updates.

Guidance to reduce the risk of COVID-19

The most important risk factors for COVID-19 are travel to an affected area (both national and international) and contact with a person who has COVID-19. However, there is now early evidence of community spread in Connecticut so it is possible to have COVID-19 infection without these risk factors.

For all of our patients we strongly recommend the following:

  • Practice good hand washing—20 seconds with soap and water or alcohol-based sanitizer.
  • Do not shake hands.
  • Cough into your elbow or into a tissue and discard.
  • Clean high touch surfaces in your home and work place (such as door knobs, countertops, remotes, etc.) frequently.
  • Avoid touching railings, door knobs, faucets, etc. in public areas. Use your sleeve or tissue if necessary.
  • Avoid crowded or enclosed areas. Keep 6 feet between you and others.
  • Limit travel as much as possible.
  • Avoid sick individuals.
  • Monitor yourself at home. If you feel feverish, check your temperature with a thermometer. If you have a fever, follow the guidance below.
  • Stay home if you are ill; do not go to work or social events.

CDC - Steps to Prevent Illness

If you develop fever, cough, and/or shortness of breath

Call your primary care provider or Acute Care after hours for instructions from our clinical team. Please do not come to the Yale Health Center without calling first.

  • Internal Medicine 203-432-0038
  • Ob/Gyn 203-432-0222
  • Pediatrics 203-432-0206
  • Acute Care 203-432-0123

Testing for COVID-19

  • At this time, health centers including Yale Health have extremely limited access to testing. Testing is reserved for those with more serious symptoms as well as known travel or contact with someone who has COVID-19 and is subject to approval from the Connecticut Department of Health.
  • Patients without symptoms will not be tested at this time.

Access to general clinical care and services

Yale Health will be open regardless of the level of COVID-19 in our community. Available services will include Acute Care, Pharmacy, Diagnostic Imaging and Blood Draw. However, we may postpone certain appointments such as preventive and routine visits to enable staff to focus on patients whose needs are more acute. We will of course notify you if such changes become necessary.

Telephone visits

Over the next several weeks, we will be transitioning some scheduled visits to telephone visits. Telephone visits will take place at the same time as your current appointment but are conducted entirely by telephone so that you do not need to come to your appointment in person.

Our providers will be reviewing schedules to identify visits that can be safely conducted by telephone. We will be calling you to explain the process if this is an option for your upcoming visit. If you prefer to keep your in-person visit you may.

If you have a scheduled visit and would like to convert it to a telephone visit, please contact us via MyChart or call your provider’s department and request the change.

People at increased risk of serious disease

Certain people are at higher risk of more serious disease should they contract COVID-19. These risks include:

  • those over age 65
  • those with chronic heart, lung, kidney or liver disease;
  • those undergoing active cancer treatment;
  • those with immune deficiency conditions or taking medications that suppress the immune system.

While data is limited pregnant women may be at increased risk.
We will be preparing a separate communication for this higher risk population in the next several days. In the meantime, we recommend you follow the general guidance listed above and review CDC guidance. Telephone visits may be especially suitable if you fit into this high risk category.

Prescriptions and Pharmacy

  • To ensure that our patients have adequate medication supplies, our pharmacy will be authorizing early medication refills for most maintenance medications (excluding controlled substances) if you have less than 50 days of your medication on hand. Call the Pharmacy at 203-432-0033.
  • You may also want to consider using Magellan Rx Home for mail delivery of your maintenance medications.

Resources

 

COVID-19 – Moving courses online and other significant updates (March 10, 2020)

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

I write with significant updates to Yale’s response to the spread of COVID-19.

In recent weeks, we have all seen that the challenges posed by COVID-19 are rapidly changing across our country and the world. I ask you to join me in taking new actions to prevent and slow the spread of the virus. Current scientific and medical evidence suggests that preemptive public health measures are more effective than those that are reactive. By being proactive as a community, we can safeguard our own health and the well-being of those with whom we interact.

In this message, I describe actions that will minimize close-proximity interaction among members of our community in classrooms, dining halls, residential colleges, and other common facilities:
•    Moving classes online when they resume after spring recess
•    Asking students to remain home or return home when possible
•    Limiting international and domestic travel
•    Maintaining continuity of research and teaching
•    Ensuring ongoing staff operations and well-being
•    Restricting the size of events

Maintaining continuity of research and teaching

While the health of Yale’s faculty, staff, and students is our top priority, the university also remains committed to its mission of research and education. Faculty members and graduate and professional students are asked to carry out their teaching responsibilities online. Research groups have been asked to make contingency plans to maintain research continuity, which may involve faculty, staff, and students continuing to work and study in labs, machine shops, offices, and other campus facilities. The university will maintain central services to support research and teaching.

This plan is based on the expert advice of dedicated faculty and medical professionals at the Yale Schools of Public Health, Medicine, and Nursing; Yale Health; and local, state, and federal agencies. By taking these preventive measures, we protect those who are most vulnerable to this disease.

For advice on what to do if you become ill, and other important information, askpoorvucenter@yale.edu).

Asking students to remain home or return home when possible

We are asking Yale College students to remain at home after spring recess. For undergraduates who are on campus now, please make every effort to return home as soon as possible, and no later than Sunday, March 15. Yale College Dean Marvin Chun will be providing additional details in the coming days. Undergraduates will have the support of the university in meeting their academic requirements remotely while at home. I understand that some undergraduates consider New Haven to be their home or cannot leave the university at this time. The Yale College Dean’s Office will provide separate instructions for these students, who also will take their classes online.

Graduate and professional students are encouraged to remain off-campus and participate in online instruction, unless required to be on campus due to the nature of their research or academic programs. More information is forthcoming from the deans of each school.

The university will remain open and continue to provide custodial and limited dining services.

Limiting international and domestic travel

The following is an update and elaboration on previously announced travel policies. Please note that this guidance pertains to faculty, staff, and graduate and professional students. We urge Yale College students presently on campus to return home if possible. 

  • University-sponsored travel (Travel is considered university-sponsored if it draws on a university-administered funding source.)
    • All university-sponsored international travel is now prohibited.
    • We strongly urge you to postpone university-sponsored domestic travel and find ways to conduct the work online.
  • Personal travel
    • For personal international travel, we urge you to carefully reconsider your travel choices and avoid traveling if possible.
    • For personal domestic travel, please consider your decisions carefully and avoid traveling if your agenda includes participation in conferences or other large gatherings.

If you must travel, review the table that summarizes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) travel notices and Yale Health guidance. Most importantly, if you are traveling to any country or region on the CDC Warning Level 3 list, complete this registration form and self-monitor and self-isolate for 14 days after you return using these guidelines.

Maintaining continuity of research and teaching

While the health of Yale’s faculty, staff, and students is our top priority, the university also remains committed to its mission of research and education. Faculty members and graduate and professional students are asked to carry out their teaching responsibilities online. Research groups have been asked to make contingency plans to maintain research continuity, which may involve faculty, staff, and students continuing to work and study in labs, machine shops, offices, and other campus facilities. The university will maintain central services to support research and teaching.

Ensuring ongoing staff operations and well-being

By separate email this week, staff will be provided with information about measures the university is taking to plan for the continuation of university operations and to ensure everyone’s continued safety. Most generally, we encourage staff to hold meetings virtually, and we ask each staff leader to provide flexibility for people to work from home when consistent with their job responsibilities and to have time to care for any ill family members, should the need arise.

Restricting the size of events

On March 7, the university asked students, faculty, and staff to postpone, cancel, or adjust all Yale-hosted events, other than classes, expected to involve 100 or more participants. Yale’s COVID-19 website provides additional information about Yale’s libraries and museums. As noted in the original announcement, even if an event has fewer than 100 people, please think about moving your event online or increasing the size of the venue so that participants can be spread apart.

We will continue to monitor carefully the spread of COVID-19. It may prove necessary to extend the actions described here beyond their end date or to take additional measures to safeguard everyone’s health based on emerging medical and scientific information. We will keep you informed of updates by email and will maintain the latest news and guidance on Yale’s COVID-19 website.

I appreciate the students, faculty, and staff members who have worked so hard in recent weeks to promote the health of members of our community and to contribute to the well-being of those who live and work beyond our campus. In the coming weeks, we will need to rely on one another’s resilience, patience, and expertise more than ever before. Please accept my gratitude for your efforts to protect each other’s health and support the continuity of the university’s mission. Sincerely, Peter Salovey President Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology”>please visit Yale’s COVID-19 website.

Sincerely,
 
Peter Salovey
President
Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology

COVID-19 Update – Events of 100 People or More

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

This email contains new information about Yale’s response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

At this time, there are no known cases of COVID-19 at Yale University, but individuals who work in Connecticut, and live elsewhere, have tested positive for the virus. Although the individual risk of contracting the virus remains low, the university continues to be focused on making decisions to safeguard our health and safety and the health and safety of those individuals with whom we may come into contact. What follows is guidance based on the status of the situation today; however, developments are fluid and moving quickly.

The guidance provided in this email and other important information are available at Yale’s COVID-19 website.

NEW GUIDANCE REGARDING ON-CAMPUS MEETINGS AND EVENTS

  • To prevent transmission of the virus, we are asking students, faculty, and staff to postpone, cancel, or adjust all Yale-hosted events, other than classes, that will have 100 or more participants. Adjustments to events could include using technology to allow remote participation and increasing the venue size to allow participants to maintain distance from one another. This recommendation applies to events taking place between March 9, 2020, and April 15, 2020.
  • All regularly scheduled university courses and dining operations will continue. We are cleaning and disinfecting commonly touched surfaces in all frequently used public areas.
  • Zoom technology is available to all Yale community members and can be used to move an event, or portions of it, online.
  • Even if an event has fewer than 100 people, please think about the size of the venue and accommodations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the virus can spread between people who are within six feet of one another. Consider if the venue allows people adequate space to spread out and if participants have opportunities to wash their hands regularly. Adjust meeting formats as needed.
  • If you are postponing, cancelling, or adjusting an event, please communicate quickly and clearly with participants.
  • We remind everyone to continue to take personal precautions and practice good hygiene.

For travel guidance, advice on what to do if you become ill, and other information, please visit Yale’s COVID-19 website.

We are mindful that some schools began spring recess yesterday evening. Many of us are thinking ahead to our return to campus. If events dictate that we must take more significant action than what is described here, we will provide further updates. For now, we are operating under the assumption that classes will begin again as scheduled.

We will continue to monitor carefully the spread of COVID-19 and keep you updated on important changes. We are committed to drawing from the best scientific and medical evidence available to safeguard everyone’s health and safety.

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Scott Strobel
Provost
Henry Ford II Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

COVID-19 Update – Travel, Yale Health Guidance, and University Planning and Response, March 2, 2020

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

We are continuing to monitor the spread of COVID-19, and we write to provide updates related to COVID-19 and travel. Please review Yale’s new COVID-19 website for additional information as well as a link to this and past announcements.

COVID-19 spread and response continue to change rapidly for travelers abroad as well as in this country. Keep in mind that any travel may be disrupted in the coming months. Other countries and regions may be added to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Level 3 Travel Warning (as Italy and Iran have been recently), and travelers who have been in those areas would be asked to self-isolate upon returning to campus. In addition, more foreign governments are imposing travel restrictions, such as closing borders, and as more restrictions are imposed, there is some risk of travelers being forced to remain in a country. We urge you to consider carefully your travel choices and whether it is necessary to travel at this time. 

If you do travel, take these actions:

  • Register your travel, including for spring recess, even if you are traveling within the United States.
  • Download the International SOS (ISOS) app.
  • Stay alert to changes and developments that may affect your plans. Monitor travel advisories, including potential restrictions on border crossings, and be ready to change your plans if conditions change. View the list of CDC travel notices.
  • Follow Yale Health recommendations listed below (e.g., frequent hand washing). 
  • If you should feel ill while traveling, call ISOS 215-942-8478 for advice before going to a health care facility. ISOS medical staff can provide advice on how to get treatment but will not be able to get you out of a country if any government restrictions have been put in place.  

We strongly encourage you to review the table below, which summarizes CDC travel notices as of March 2, 2020, and Yale Health guidance. COVID-19 spread and response are rapidly evolving, and this table will be regularly updated at Yale’s COVID-19 website.

CDC Travel Notice

Countries and Regions (as designated by CDC)

Yale Health Guidance*

Warning – Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel

  • China (this does not include Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan)
  • Iran
  • Italy
  • South Korea

Alert – Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions

  • Japan
  • Travel may continue to these countries and regions, but you may wish to reconsider your plans because the situation is changing rapidly.
  • Older adults and those with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for severe disease and should consider postponing nonessential travel.
  • Upon return, please self-observe (remain alert for fever, cough, or difficulty breathing) and see guidelines* for contacting healthcare.
  • Follow precautions to avoid illness.
  • Register your travel and download the ISOS app

Watch – Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions

  • Hong Kong

*If you experience fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and you have had contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient and/or traveled from a location with a Level 3 or Level 2 travel notice within 14 days of the onset of illness, stay home and contact a healthcare provider for guidance— do not go to a healthcare facility prior to calling your doctor or a hospital emergency room for instructions. If you are a Yale student or Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312), or Pediatrics (203-432-0206) from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For urgent attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please call Yale Health Acute Care (203-432-0123). If you are an Aetna member, please contact your primary care provider.

We also encourage you to take the following precautions for your well-being and safety:

  • If you have not done so already, get a flu shot. This will help reduce the burden on the health system and help others. Members of the Yale community can obtain the influenza vaccine free of charge at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street daily from Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water after coughing, sneezing, and blowing your nose. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable.
  • Avoid contact with sick people. 
  • Stay home if you are ill—do not go to work or class.
  • If you need medical attention, call your provider before going to a healthcare facility.

Although there are no cases of COVID-19 infection at Yale or in Connecticut, the university is consulting with the Connecticut Department of Public Health and experts from the Yale School of Public Health and School of Medicine to update the university’s existing pandemic response plan in the event of widespread U.S. community transmission of COVID-19 or announcement of a COVID-19 pandemic. If any of these scenarios occur, you will be notified via email and through the Yale ALERT system, and the main Yale webpage will include a banner with a link to the university status and action plan. Please go to the Yale ALERT webpage to make sure your contact information is current, and regularly check Yale’s new COVID-19 website.

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Donald L. Filer
Associate Vice President for Global Strategy
 

COVID-19 Update – Yale Health Guidance for Travelers (February 26)

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

In response to guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Yale is asking all travelers arriving to campus from mainland China and from South Korea to complete this registration form and to self-monitor and self-isolate for 14 days using these guidelines. Once visitors have completed the form, Yale Health will contact them to provide assistance and further instructions. If a traveler has returned from mainland China or South Korea more than 14 days ago and is asymptomatic (i.e., no fever, cough, fatigue, and/or difficulty breathing), then no further action is needed. You can read more about symptoms of COVID-19.

We have created a table to summarize CDC travel notices and Yale Health guidance (see below). This table will be regularly updated at the Yale Health announcement webpage.

CDC Travel Notice

Yale Health Guidance*

Countries and Regions

Warning – Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel

  • All nonessential travel to any country in this category should be cancelled or deferred.
  • Upon return, complete this registration form as well as self-monitor and self-isolate for 14 days using these guidelines.
  • People’s Republic of China (this does not include Hong Kong, Macau, or the island of Taiwan)
  • South Korea

Alert – Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions

  • Travel may continue to these countries, but you may wish to reconsider your plans because the situation is changing rapidly.
  • Older adults and those with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for severe disease and should consider postponing nonessential travel.
  • Upon return, please self-observe (remain alert for fever, cough, or difficulty breathing) and see guidelines* for contacting healthcare.
  • Follow precautions to avoid illness.
  • Register your travel and download the ISOS app
  • Japan
  • Italy
  • Iran

Watch – Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions

  • Hong Kong

*If you experience fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and you have had contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient and/or traveled from a location with a Level 3 or Level 2 travel notice within 14 days of the onset of illness, stay home and contact a healthcare provider for guidance—do not go to a healthcare facility prior to calling your doctor or a hospital emergency room for instructions. If you are a Yale student or Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312), or Pediatrics (203-432-0206) from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For urgent attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please call Yale Health Acute Care (203-432-0123). If you are an Aetna member, please contact your primary care provider.

The spread of COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving global situation, and it is likely the CDC will issue additional travel advisories for other countries in the coming weeks. Yale will ask travelers returning from countries with Level 3 travel alerts to complete the registration form and to participate in infection prevention through self-monitoring and self-isolation for 14 days. Travelers from Level 2 Alert Countries should monitor their temperature and symptoms for 14 days and contact a healthcare provider according to the instructions in the table above if they become ill.

There are no cases of COVID-19 infection at Yale or in Connecticut. We are working closely with the Connecticut Department of Public Health to track the overall situation regarding COVID-19 and to protect the health and wellbeing of the Yale community. Please review the Yale Health announcement webpage for additional information, including previous messages and key links.

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul Genecin

Director, Yale Health

Donald L. Filer

Associate Vice President for Global Strategy

Covid-19 Travel Update and Health Information (February 24, 2020)

As is apparent in news reports, the worldwide COVID-19 (formerly 2019-nCoV or novel coronavirus) outbreak situation is rapidly evolving. We write with an update on how the latest information affects the Yale campus and any plans you may have for traveling abroad.  

You can find the following in this email:

  • Travel safety
  • Infection prevention through voluntary self-isolation in the Yale community
  • Infection control mandate for people arriving from mainland China
  • University preparations for COVID-19
  • Information about COVID-19 infection and prevention

TRAVEL SAFETY

If you will be traveling, we urge you to:

  • Stay alert to changes and developments that may affect your plans. Monitor travel advisories, including potential restrictions on border crossings, and be ready to change your plans if conditions change. View the list of CDC travel notices here.
  • Register your travel and download the ISOS app
  • If you should feel ill while traveling, call ISOS 215-942-8478 for advice before going to a health care facility. ISOS medical staff can provide advice on how to get treatment but will not be able to get you out of a country if any government restrictions have been put in place.  

All travel should be deferred to any country for which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a “Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel.” China is in this category, and South Korea was added on February 24. Therefore, all travel to China and South Korea should be cancelled or deferred to a later date.

The CDC has issued alerts “Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions” for Iran, Italy, and Japan. Travel may continue to these countries, but you may wish to reconsider your plans because the situation is changing rapidly. Older adults and those with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for severe disease and should consider postponing nonessential travel.

CDC has issued “Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions” for Hong Kong. There are no travel restrictions, but travelers should practice routine precautions to avoid illness (see below).  

Yale travelers should keep several points in mind:

  • Do not travel to Level 3 countries.
  • Level 2 countries may be elevated on short or no notice to Level 3.
  • There are likely to be more countries for which Level 2 alerts are issued.
  • Reported number of cases may not indicate the severity of the outbreak in a particular location due to reporting delays or other anomalies.  
  • The response of governments will vary dramatically.  
  • If the current pattern continues, the U.S. government may ban travel into the U.S. from countries changed to Level 3 by individuals who are not U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents. U.S. citizens and permanent residents will be required to self-isolate for at least 14 days. As of today, these restrictions only apply to China, but that may change at any time.
  • If CDC guidance changes, Yale will respond accordingly. It is possible that CDC could recommend that individuals returning from a Level 2 country should self-isolate. CDC also may increase the time period for self-isolation beyond the current 14 days. Keep this in mind as you make your travel decisions.  

We are continuing to monitor the situation and will issue additional guidance as needed. 
 
INFECTION PREVENTION THROUGH VOLUNTARY SELF-ISOLATION IN THE YALE COMMUNITY

On February 3, 2020, Yale University responded to guidance from the CDC by initiating voluntary self-isolation and self-monitoring for travelers arriving from mainland China. Yale Health registered 109 students, staff, faculty, family members, and visitors, most of whom have now completed the 14-day monitoring period. We are pleased to say that we have had no cases of infection to date, and we extend heartfelt thanks to all of the registrants for their cooperation. 

INFECTION CONTROL MANDATE FOR PEOPLE ARRIVING FROM MAINLAND CHINA

There has been no community spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. to date. The national public health strategy has prioritized prevention of infection through limitations on travel as well as quarantine or self-isolation of people arriving from China. Infection control mandates for arriving travelers include the following:

  • Individuals who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents and who have been in China in the last 14 days will be denied entry.
  • Other travelers from mainland China must now arrive in the U.S. through 11 designated airports where they undergo screening for symptoms and/or risks of infection. 
  • Arrivals with recent travel to Hubei Province will be quarantined for 14 days. 
  • If they are asymptomatic, travelers from mainland China outside Hubei Province will receive a health information card and be required to undergo a 14-day period of self-isolation and monitoring with public health supervision at their travel destinations.
    • The State of Connecticut Department of Public Health will delegate to Yale Health the responsibility for monitoring members of the Yale community registered for this program. We will provide affected individuals with detailed health information and daily assistance.

You can read more about these infection control measures.

UNIVERSITY PREPARATIONS FOR COVID-19

Because of the magnitude of the epidemic, the CDC and healthcare organizations across the country are making preparations in case we encounter community spread of COVID-19. In our own community, Yale Health, Yale Medicine, Yale School of Public Health, Yale Emergency Management, Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH), and public health authorities at the state and local level are collaborating closely. 

  • We have created a 24-hour hotline (203-432-6604) for concerned members of the community. 
  • We have developed and disseminated clinical protocols to facilitate consistent evaluation of patients with risk factors and/or symptoms of COVID-19 infection. 
  • In collaboration with Yale Medicine and YNHH, we have implemented a mandatory data field in our electronic medical record system to ensure consistent screening for travel history and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 infection. 
  • We have developed and disseminated protocols for limiting the spread of infection in the healthcare setting. 
  • We have relaunched the influenza vaccination drive and reminded our community that it is not too late to get the vaccine. Members of the Yale community can obtain the influenza vaccine free of charge at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street daily from Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19 INFECTION AND PREVENTION

Facts About COVID-19 Infection
The risk of COVID-19 infection is dependent on exposure, but details about the new virus are still emerging. The most important route of transmission is likely close contact (six feet or less) with sick patients who spread respiratory droplets when they cough or sneeze. The risk of spread from asymptomatic people and from touching surfaces and objects contaminated with virus is much lower than droplet spread from sick patients. The reported incubation period (time from exposure to the onset of symptoms) ranges from two to 14 days. 

Severity of COVID-19 infection ranges from mild to severe, but the majority of cases in China have not required hospitalization. Critical illness has developed in 15 percent of Wuhan patients and up to 3 percent are dying of the disease. Fever of >100.4 F (>38 C), cough, and shortness of breath are the most frequently reported symptoms. COVID-19 symptoms overlap with those of influenza and other respiratory infections. Therefore, the CDC has published guidelines to identify patients at risk of COVID-19 and determine when testing is necessary.  

Prevention of COVID-19 Infection 
There is no vaccine for COVID-19 at present, so prevention is crucial. Here are some ways to avoid viral respiratory infections including COVID-19:

  • Avoid contact with people who are ill. 
  • Refrain from touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable. 
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces. 
  • Facemasks are not recommended for healthy people to avoid respiratory viruses including COVID-19.

What to Do If You Become Ill 
If you experience fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and you have had contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient and/or traveled from mainland China within 14 days of the onset of illness, stay home and contact a healthcare provider for guidance—do not go to a healthcare facility prior to calling your doctor or a hospital emergency room for instructions. 

  • If you are a Yale student or Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312), or Pediatrics (203-432-0206) from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For urgent attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please call Yale Health Acute Care (203-432-0123).
  • If you are an Aetna member or have other healthcare coverage, please contact your physician. 
  • Avoid contact with others to limit spread. 
  • Cover your cough/sneeze with a tissue or sleeve, not your hands. Wash your hands with soap and water after coughing, sneezing, and blowing your nose. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable.
  • Facemasks are recommended for people with symptoms of respiratory infection to minimize the risk of spread of infection. 

Information for Healthcare Workers
The CDC has issued detailed interim guidance for those who interact with potentially infected patients. Protect yourself and others by acquainting yourself with these recommendations.

Nondiscrimination
Yale University is committed to maintaining an environment of respect and freedom from discrimination and to supporting all members of our community affected by this global health threat. Bias, discrimination, and harassment are inimical to our values and violate Yale policies. For more information, please go to https://yalehealth.yale.edu/nondiscrimination-notice. 

For Additional Information

We are continuing to monitor developments related to COVID-19 and will keep you updated. To see this and past updates as well as important links, please visit Yale Health’s announcement webpage

Sincerely, 

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Donald L. Filer
Associate Vice President for Global Strategy

Spring Break Travel Safety and COVID-19 Update - Feb. 18, 2020

February 18, 2020

Dear Members of the Yale Community,

With spring break approaching, we write to remind you of the resources available if you are traveling abroad or within the U.S. We write also to provide updates regarding COVID-19 (formerly 2019-nCoV or novel coronavirus), grateful that we have had no cases of the infection on campus to date and that there has been no community spread of the infection in the U.S.

You can find the following in this email:
•    Spring break travel safety
•    Infection prevention through voluntary self-isolation in the Yale community
•    New infection control mandate for people arriving from mainland China
•    University preparations for COVID-19
•    Information about COVID-19 infection and prevention

SPRING BREAK TRAVEL SAFETY
We want to emphasize resources that are available in light of concerns regarding COVID-19 and urge you to register your travel as provided below. For many students, faculty, and staff, international travel is important for their research, work, or studies and can continue as planned if travelers plan ahead and follow guidance from health officials and other government agencies.  

As of now, all travel to China should be cancelled or deferred to a later date. In addition, some countries, particularly in Southeast Asia, are imposing restrictions on entering, so you may wish to reconsider travel at this time to those countries. However, most travel worldwide is not affected. Please keep in mind the following points that will help ensure safe and smooth travels:
 
1. Stay alert to changes and developments that may affect your plans. Monitor travel advisories, including potential restrictions on border crossings.  

2. Register your travel with Yale. Whether you are traveling for research, conferences, internships, or other reasons, please register your travel, so that in the event of a major emergency, the university will be able to contact you.   
 
3. If you are an undergraduate traveler, review the Yale College travel policy.
 
4. Borrow a secure laptop from Yale ITS and consider using burner phones for high-risk destinations. Review these best practices for traveling overseas with electronic devices.
 
5. Understand what your health insurance will cover while you are away from home and consider purchasing supplemental travel health insurance.
 
6. International students and scholars should check their immigration documents before leaving the U.S. For more information about travel emergencies related to your immigration status or problems returning to the U.S., go to https://oiss.yale.edu/life-at-yale/safety-security/emergency-information.
 
7. U.S. Country Sanctions and Economic Embargoes:

  • Current U.S. sanctions and embargoes may require you to have U.S. government approval before you travel to an embargoed country and/or may restrict your activities in that country. If you violate these rules, you may be subject to civil and/or criminal penalties.
  • Those traveling to Iran, North Korea, Syria, or the Crimea region of Ukraine should contact Don Deyo, director of export control licensing, at (203) 785-3817 for assistance.
  • Those traveling to Cuba should email iocc@yale.edu for assistance. Restrictions on travel to Cuba remain in place: trips to Cuba that are primarily tourist-oriented, along with many other transactions relating to Cuba, continue to be prohibited.

Although this message is most relevant to spring break travel, we know that many community members already have questions about summer travel and programs abroad in light of the COVID-19 situation. We are monitoring and plan to be able to give specific information to the community with respect to summer travel by April 1.
 
INFECTION PREVENTION THROUGH VOLUNTARY SELF-ISOLATION IN THE YALE COMMUNITY
On February 3, 2020, Yale University responded to guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by initiating voluntary self-isolation and self-monitoring for travelers arriving from mainland China. Yale Health registered 109 students, staff, faculty, family members, and visitors, many of whom have now completed the 14-day monitoring period. We are pleased to say that we have had no cases of infection to date, and we extend heartfelt thanks to all of the registrants for their cooperation.

NEW INFECTION CONTROL MANDATE FOR PEOPLE ARRIVING FROM MAINLAND CHINA
There has been no community spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. to date. The national public health strategy has prioritized prevention of infection through limitations on travel as well as quarantine or self-isolation of people arriving from China. Important new infection control mandates for arriving travelers include the following:

  • All travelers from mainland China must now arrive in the U.S. through 11 designated airports where they undergo screening for symptoms and/or risks of infection.
  • Arrivals with recent travel to Hubei Province will be quarantined for 14 days.
  • If they are asymptomatic, travelers from mainland China outside Hubei Province will receive a health information card and be required to undergo a 14-day period of self-isolation and monitoring with public health supervision at their travel destinations.
    • The State of Connecticut Department of Public Health will delegate to Yale Health the responsibility for monitoring members of the Yale community registered for this program. We will provide affected individuals with detailed health information and daily assistance.

You can read more about these infection control measures at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/from-china.html.

UNIVERSITY PREPARATIONS FOR COVID-19
Because of the magnitude of the epidemic in China and travel-related cases in other countries, the CDC and healthcare organizations across the country are making preparations in case we encounter community spread of COVID-19. In our own community, Yale Health, Yale Medicine, Yale School of Public Health, Yale Emergency Management, Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH), and public health authorities at the state and local level are collaborating closely.

  • We have created a 24-hour hotline (203-432-6604) for concerned members of the community.
  • We have developed and disseminated clinical protocols to facilitate consistent evaluation of patients with risk factors and/or symptoms of COVID-19 infection.
  • In collaboration with Yale Medicine and YNHH, we have implemented a mandatory data field in our electronic medical record system to ensure consistent screening for travel history and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 infection.
  • We have developed and disseminated protocols for limiting the spread of infection in the healthcare setting.
  • We have relaunched the influenza vaccination drive and reminded our community that it is not too late to get the vaccine. Members of the Yale community can obtain the influenza vaccine free of charge at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street daily from Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19 INFECTION AND PREVENTION

Facts About COVID-19 Infection
The risk of COVID-19 infection is dependent on exposure, but details about the new virus are still emerging. The most important route of transmission is likely close contact (six feet or less) with sick patients who spread respiratory droplets when they cough or sneeze. The risk of spread from asymptomatic people and from touching surfaces and objects contaminated with virus is much lower than droplet spread from sick patients. The reported incubation period (time from exposure to the onset of symptoms) ranges from two to 14 days.

Severity of COVID-19 infection ranges from mild to severe, but the majority of cases in China have not required hospitalization. Critical illness has developed in 15 percent of Wuhan patients and up to 3 percent are dying of the disease. Fever of >100.4 F (>38 C), cough, and shortness of breath are the most frequently reported symptoms. COVID-19 symptoms overlap with those of influenza and other respiratory infections. Therefore, the CDC has published guidelines to identify patients at risk of COVID-19 and determine when testing is necessary  

Prevention of COVID-19 Infection
There is no vaccine for COVID-19 at present, so prevention is crucial. Here are some ways to avoid viral respiratory infections including COVID-19:

  • Avoid contact with people who are ill.
  • Refrain from touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Facemasks are not recommended for healthy people to avoid respiratory viruses including COVID-19.

What to Do If You Become Ill
If you experience fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and you have had contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient and/or traveled from mainland China within 14 days of the onset of illness, stay home and contact a healthcare provider for guidance—do not go to a healthcare facility prior to calling your doctor or a hospital emergency room for instructions.
o    If you are a Yale student or Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312), or Pediatrics (203-432-0206) from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For urgent attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please call Yale Health Acute Care (203-432-0123).

  • If you are an Aetna member or have other healthcare coverage, please contact your physician.
  • Avoid contact with others to limit spread.
  • Cover your cough/sneeze with a tissue or sleeve, not your hands. Wash your hands with soap and water after coughing, sneezing, and blowing your nose. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable.
  • Facemasks are recommended for people with symptoms of respiratory infection to minimize the risk of spread of infection.

Information for Healthcare Workers
The CDC has issued detailed interim guidance for those who interact with potentially infected patients. Protect yourself and others by acquainting yourself with these recommendations.

Nondiscrimination
Yale University is committed to maintaining an environment of respect and freedom from discrimination and to supporting all members of our community affected by this global health threat. Bias, discrimination, and harassment are inimical to our values and violate Yale policies. For more information, please go to https://yalehealth.yale.edu/nondiscrimination-notice.

For Additional Information

Public Health Authorities

Yale Resources

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Donald L. Filer
Associate Vice President for Global Strategy

 

2019 Novel Coronavirus Update February 8

Yale Health continues to ask members of the Yale community who have returned from mainland China in the past 14 days to complete this registration form. In keeping with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance travelers who are within the 14-day window of their return from mainland China are asked to self-isolate using these guidelines. If you returned from mainland China more than 14 days ago, no further action is needed.

There are no cases of 2019-nCoV infection at Yale or in Connecticut. For more information please call the Yale Health Hotline at (203) 432-6604 or go to these websites:

Public Health Authorities

Yale Resources

Announcement from Scott Strobel, Feb. 3

Dear Members of the Yale Community:

Yale University continues to closely monitor the outbreak of coronavirus 2019-nCoV. The number of cases in China has been rising dramatically; for now, there has been limited spread to other countries, including the United States. We reported on January 31 that a high school student from China who was participating in the annual Yale Model United Nations conference tested negative for 2019-nCoV. 

The U.S. government has implemented measures to better detect and contain the coronavirus. These measures include a “Level 4-Do Not Travel to China” advisory from the U.S. Department of State, and a declaration of a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

In keeping with intensifying public health measures, all Yale University faculty, staff, students, visitors and other members of the Yale community who have returned from mainland China since January 20, 2020, should complete this registration form.  Yale Health will then contact you to provide assistance and further instructions. The information you provide will be kept secure and confidential.  Consistent with U.S. Government advice, we also ask you to self-isolate for 14 days after returning from mainland China.  Guidelines for self-isolation may be found at this website

If you have traveled in China and returned to the U.S. on or before January 19, 2020, and are not showing disease symptoms, then no further action is needed.

We are working closely with the Connecticut Department of Public Health to track the overall situation regarding the coronavirus and to protect the health and wellbeing of the Yale community.  Yale Health and Yale Medicine are maintaining information on their webpages.

A reminder about influenza:
We are now nearing the peak of seasonal influenza (flu). Influenza and 2019-nCoV infections have similar symptoms including fever, cough, congestion and shortness of breath.  At this time, influenza poses a greater risk to our community than coronavirus.  Public health authorities strongly advise unimmunized members of the community to get the flu shot. 

Members of the Yale community can obtain the influenza vaccine free of charge at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Please check the Yale Health website for updated information about 2019-nCoV including 2019 Novel Coronavirus FAQ’s

We will continue to provide updates as new information becomes available. 
 
Sincerely, 
Scott Strobel
Provost and Henry Ford II Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Janet Lindner
Vice President for Human Resources & Administration

Dr. Paul Genecin
Director, Yale Health

Novel Coronavirus Update January 28

A message from Dr. Paul Genecin

To:  All Students, faculty and staff

On Sunday, I wrote to inform you that a high school student from China who participated in the annual Yale Model United Nations conference exhibited fever and cough and was evaluated in the Yale-New Haven Hospital Emergency Department over the weekend. A test was ordered to rule out infection with the novel coronavirus (abbreviated 2019-nCoV). The result is not yet back from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). I will notify the community as soon as the result is available.

CDC Travel Advisory:
Yesterday, the CDC issued a travel notice recommending that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to China because of the 2019-nCoV epidemic. You can read the entire advisory at:
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/warning/novel-coronavirus-china?smid=nytcore-ios-share.

The salient points in this new travel advisory are:

  • 2019-nCoV causes a respiratory illness with fever and cough. Some people experience more serious illness with pneumonia and respiratory failure, and fatalities have been reported. There is active transmission from person to person reported in China.
  • As a result, China has closed transport within and out of Wuhan and other cities in the Hubei province.
  • The public health situation in China is rapidly evolving with new cases reported in other Chinese cities.
  • There is limited medical care available in affected areas.
  • Air travelers arriving in the U.S. from China are being screened for signs of illness such as cough, fever and difficulty breathing.
  • If you have been in China in the last 14 days and are experiencing illness with cough, fever or difficulty with breathing, you should:
    • Call your doctor’s office or an emergency room to report your symptoms and seek advice. Do not go to a clinic for care prior to calling.
      • If you are a Yale student or Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312) or Pediatrics (203-432-0206) from 8:30am to 5pm. For urgent attention 24x7, please call Yale Health Acute Care: 203-432-0123.
      • If you are an Aetna member or have other healthcare coverage, please contact your physician.

If you must travel to China:

  • In light of the CDC advice and US State Department warnings, you are urged to evaluate your travel plans and consider delaying travel to a later date.
  • Contact your healthcare provider to discuss your travel plans, bearing in mind that older adults and those with chronic health problems may have a higher risk of complications in 2019-nCoV infection.
  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid animals whether dead or alive, including animal markets and animal products such as raw meat.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable. 

A note about influenza:

We are now nearing the peak of seasonal influenza (flu). Influenza and 2019-nCoV infections have similar symptoms including fever, cough, congestion and shortness of breath. At this time, influenza poses a greater risk to our community than coronavirus. While there is no vaccine for coronavirus infection, the influenza vaccine is readily available, safe and effective. Public health authorities strongly advise unimmunized members of the community to get the flu shot. In addition to preventing or mitigating the severity of flu, this vaccine will simplify the evaluation of patients with flu-like symptoms in the event that we begin to see cases of 2019-nCoV in our community.
                                                    
Members of the Yale community can obtain the influenza vaccine free of charge at the Yale Health Center at 55 Lock Street daily from Monday to Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm.

Please check the Yale Health website (https://yalehealth.yale.edu/) for updated information about 2019-nCoV. I draw your attention to newly posted FAQ’s.  You may also wish to check the CDC and World Health Organization (WHO) websites for more information about the novel coronavirus outbreak:  

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/
WHO: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

January 26, 2020 - Coronavirus Update

January 26, 2020

A message from Dr. Paul Genecin

To:  All Students, faculty and staff

On Friday, I wrote to let you know that Yale Health, Yale Emergency Management, and Environmental Health and Safety are closely monitoring the outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and that we would keep the community updated as new information became available.

I write today to inform you that last night, Yale became aware that a high-school student from China who was participating in the annual Yale Model United Nations (YMUN) conference, scheduled for January 23-26 on our campus, exhibited cough and fever and was taken to Yale New Haven Hospital, where the student tested positive for influenza. This test result suggests that the student has influenza rather than 2019-nCoV infection. However, out of an abundance of caution, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has asked that the student be tested for 2019-nCoV. We expect results in the middle of the week.

The patient, who does not exhibit severe symptoms, has been released from the hospital, but has been isolated pending the CDC’s diagnosis. The student is in good condition and we will continue to monitor their progress.

Last night, Dean of Yale College Marvin Chun, in consultation with health experts, requested that YMUN cancel all activities that had been scheduled for today, Sunday, January 26. YMUN organizers have reached out to advisors as well as those at Yale who had a part in the conference, to inform them of today’s cancelation. This was to be the event’s closing day, and while Yale regrets that the participating MUN students will not be able to complete their conference’s program, we feel it to be in the best interest of those students and of the Yale community to take this precaution.

We have established a dedicated Yale Health hotline at 203-432-6604 or 866-924-YALE (866-924-9253). All concerned members of the Yale community and YMUN participants should feel free to contact us.

What follows is a restatement of the background information and guidance I offered in my letter on Friday.

We are working closely with campus partners as well as the Connecticut Department of Public Health to track the overall situation around the coronavirus and to protect the health and wellbeing of the Yale community. Yale Health and Yale Medicine are maintaining information on their webpages:

Yale Health: https://yalehealth.yale.edu/
Yale Medicine: https://www.yalemedicine.org/

Background:

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the immediate health risk from the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) to the general American public is considered low at this time. Airline passengers from China arriving at major U.S. airports are being screened for illness. and China has restricted travel in several cities to help limit the spread of the virus. The vast majority of the approximately 850 reported cases (as of Friday) are on the Chinese mainland. Two U.S. cases in travelers returning from Wuhan to Washington State and Chicago, Illinois have been reported as of Friday. We anticipate that there may be additional U.S. reports of infection in coming days.

Public health authorities are investigating the virus’ origin, transmission, and details about the spectrum of illnesses. Coronavirus can spread from person to person by coughing and other close contact. The 2019 new coronavirus typically causes moderate illness with flu-like symptoms including fever, cough, and congestion. Shortness of breath is reported in patients with more severe illness.  Some patients — particularly the elderly and those with chronic health conditions — can develop a severe form of pneumonia and deaths have been reported. There is no current vaccine for this or other coronaviruses, and no effective antiviral antibiotic therapy.

Medical care:
Individuals who have traveled recently to Wuhan and surrounding regions or have had close contact with an ill person from those areas AND are experiencing flu like symptoms should seek medical attention from your primary care provider.  

If you are a Yale Health member, you should contact Internal Medicine (203-432-0038), Student Health (203-432-0312) or Pediatrics (203-432-0206). For urgent attention, please call Yale Health Acute Care: 203-432-0123. NOTE: We have established a dedicated Yale Health hotline at 203-432-6604 or 866-924-YALE (866-924-9253). All concerned members of the Yale community and YMUN participants should feel free to contact us.

Patients should provide their travel history and can expect to be asked screening questions related to 2019-nCoV risk when seeking care in clinical locations. Members of Yale Health concerned about 2019-nCoV should call first so that we can review symptoms and travel history and make appropriate recommendations.

Prevent illness and its spread:
•    Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, if soap and water are not available
•    Avoid contact with affected patients
•    Cover your cough/sneeze or cough/sneeze into your elbow, throw tissues away and wash your hands immediately
More information is available from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization:

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/
CDC Frequently Asked Questions: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html
WHO: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

We will continue to provide updates as new information becomes available.  

 

 

man getting a flu shot smilimg

Flu Clinic Information

Everyone 6 months & older should receive a yearly flu vaccine. Visit our flu clinic information page.

Now You Can See More

In MyChart you can see the notes your provider writes in your medical record. It includes information you shared and your provider’s thoughts about your diagnosis and treatment. Visit Shared Notes to learn more.

Join Yale Health's Patient & Family Council

Yale Health’s Patient & Family Council is part of an effort to further advance the principles of patient-centered care.

  • Council members work together with Yale Health leadership to promote, review, and advise on operational processes and programs that address the needs of patients and families.  

  • Patients and family members will play a role as ‘patient partners’, acting as a resource to the organization.

Visit the Patient Partner Opportunities page for more information or to apply to the council.

Yale Health Offering Tours and Orientation

Are you a new Yale employee who recently joined Yale Health?

Maybe you’re a member who would like more information about your Yale Health coverage.

Join us for a tour of the Yale Health Center followed by an orientation session to learn about Yale Health. 

There will be time to ask questions in a group setting or on an individual basis.

There are multiple dates and times to choose from.

Register for your tour.

Thinking about quitting smoking? There's help available

Yale faculty and staff members and their dependents can learn about the Telephonic Tobacco Cessation Program, as well as additional means of support.

Learn about resources offered by Yale Health to help students quit.

Free resources available to help visitors to campus quit.

Read the Yale News article, “Thinking about quitting smoking? There’s help available”.

.